Hessian Hill, a family owned farm hidden in the hills of Schoharie County, showcases all four seasons of agriculture. The Goblet family raises produce, sheep, hogs, cattle, chickens, horses and hay on the 350-acre, 50-year-old farm. Located in a natural valley on top of Rundy Cup Mountain, each season at Hessian Hill Farm brings with it new paths to follow.

As the Holiday season approaches, our farm showcases a variety of festive products from kissing balls and wreathes to gift baskets and center pieces. You can take a walk through our fields to pick your Christmas tree and for your holiday parties we also offer horse and cart rides with one of our Morgan horses, Fred and John. Holiday photos can be taken with lambs, horses, pigs or just the natural scenery of Hessian Hill.

The first of the year brings early spring lambs and calves. During the snowy months of January and February, many hours will be spent in the barn tending to the newborn lambs and anticipating which will be the best ewe for the summer show season. Vegetable and flower seeds are selected and purchased for the spring planting and preparations begin in the greenhouse and high tunnels.

As the weather warms and the grass begins to grow, our high tunnels and greenhouse are full of activities with planting and watering. Fresh greens, such as Swiss chard, kale, and spinach, will be ready to be picked and sold. Spring lambs will be frolicking in the fresh green pastures as the spring peepers begin to sing.

In the heat of the summer, most days are spent in the hay fields stacking wagons with hay that will be stored for winter feeding. Sheep, horses and cows are halter trained and groomed for summer shows and county fairs. Blue ribbons will fill the shelves from winning livestock classes and wool products entered into the fair. Fresh produce, herbs and flowers flourish in our personal gardens and greenhouses. Daily harvest of tomatoes, zucchini, lettuce, peppers, eggplants and many other delicious vegetables is our main priority. The long hours of summer allow for a lot of work to get done, but there is always time for a picnic in the woods, fishing in the pond,  horseback riding on the trails or just taking a relaxing walk through the fields.

Early fall brings late raspberries, apples and juicy peaches for picking. With cooler days, pumpkins, carrots, and other winter vegetables will be harvested. Wood is cut and stored in preparations for winter, and summer vegetables are canned or frozen to feed our large family during the colder months.  After picking the crops that are ready, the ground is plowed and next season’s seeds are planted. Garlic, Swiss chard, spinach and kale will be ready again in just a few short months. Spring bulbs are planted in anticipation for beautiful tulips and daffodils.

As the days get shorter, fall lambs with be born and kept for next year’s shows and sales. With food stored, seeds planted and hay in the barn, we prepare again for another long winter and busy holidays.

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